Estate Planning Blog

Elisabeth Pickle Law, P.L.C.

Estate Planning Blog
Will a Reverse Mortgage Help Me in Retirement?
Will a reverse mortgage help me in retirement?

Will a Reverse Mortgage Help Me in Retirement?

It’s not uncommon for a homeowner to take out a home equity line of credit or borrow against an existing one. This can provide the funds to pay some bills and stay afloat. Another option if you’re at least 62 with a home that’s not heavily mortgaged, is to take out a reverse mortgage. A reverse mortgage gives you tax-free cash. No repayments are due, until you die or move out of the house.

However, these loans are expensive, and not for those people who want to give their home to heirs, because most or all of the home’s equity may be eaten up by the loan principal and interest.

Fed Week’s recent article entitled “Considerations for Borrowing in Retirement” explains that reverse mortgages work best for seniors who need cash, who want to stay in their homes and who have few other options.

These HECM reverse mortgage loans are insured by the Federal Housing Administration (FHA). They let homeowners convert their home equity into cash with no monthly mortgage payments. Borrowers are still required to continue to pay property taxes and insurance. They also must maintain the home, according to FHA guidelines.

People use reverse mortgage loans to pay for home renovations, as well as medical and daily living expenses. Some homeowners who have an existing mortgage will use their reverse mortgage loan to pay off their existing mortgage and get rid of their monthly mortgage payments.

When the homeowner moves, sells the house, or passes away, the loan becomes due. If the house is held until death, heirs have the option to take out a conventional mortgage, pay off the reverse mortgage and continue to live there.

Other options include loans against your life insurance or your securities portfolio.

It is imperative that you talk with a trusted advisor about how a reverse mortgage might fit into your situation. Book a call and become a client today.

Reference: Fed Week (May 16, 2019) “Considerations for Borrowing in Retirement”

 

Power of Attorney: Which Type Do I Need?
What type of power of attorney do I need?

Power of Attorney: Which Type Do I Need?

A power of attorney is a document that grants a person the legal authority to make decisions about certain aspects of another person’s life. It gives a trusted person of your choosing the right to act as your agent in either highly specific or general decisions, depending on the type of power of attorney. As reported in Wicked Local’s article “Investors, Plans & Money: Power of attorney,” the person you name does not have to be an attorney, nor does it have to be a spouse.

Each type of power of attorney works to achieve a slightly different goal. As you work with your estate planning attorney on developing your overall estate plan, you will want to know which type you need and what your state’s requirements are. You will have to be of sound mind, with awareness of what you are signing, when the documents are prepared and signed.

Here’s a look at the basic powers of attorney:

A General Power of Attorney gives the named agent the broadest scope and authority to act and make decisions for another person. The document ideally lists the actions the person wishes them to take. This requires absolute trust, because it gives the agent complete control.

A Limited, Specific or Special Power of Attorney is a document that gives an agent the authority to act on your behalf in a very specific area of your life, task, or within a specified time frame. An example would be if you wanted someone to sell, maintain, or manage property for you. The State of Arizona requires a separate “Mental Health Power of Attorney” to make mental health care decisions for another person when that person is incapable. This is a serious consideration and should be discussed and drafted by your attorney. Contact Elisabeth Pickle Law for more information.

The Springing Power of Attorney is “triggered” (hence the name) when, and only when, certain conditions are met. That might be a loss of mental capacity, for example. This document also must be very carefully defined, and proof of the condition being met may need to be presented.

A Healthcare Power of Attorney goes by different names depending upon the state. However it is named, this is the legal document that gives the authority to make healthcare decisions, if the person is incapacitated through illness or accident. The person named as your healthcare agent should have a clear understanding of your wishes regarding extreme life-sustaining measures, as well as critical care procedures, like blood transfusions or organ transplants.

There can be problems with powers of attorney. The person named to act as an agent must be entirely trustworthy and reliable. Other issues arise, if the documents are not prepared properly. This is why an experienced estate planning attorney is the best source. Here are some examples of what can go wrong:

  • Details are lacking, so the document is declared invalid;
  • The wrong type of power of attorney is created;
  • The state requirements are not met;
  • An agent is named who the attorney would immediately know is a bad choice; and/or
  • A generic document does not contain the correct language.

Properly prepared, a power of attorney can save a tremendous amount of stress, provide the ability to make time-sensitive decisions and allow your wishes to be followed. Speak with your estate planning attorney to determine the type of power of attorney your estate plan needs.

Reference: Wicked Local (April 24, 2019) “Investors, Plans & Money: Power of attorney”

Guest Blog – Millennial Trend for Retirees: The Side Hustle
Financing retirement

Guest Blog – Millennial Trend for Retirees: The Side Hustle

Today’s blog is a guest blog written by Heidi Cookson, Marketing Director for Vinnie Bonazzoli’s firm, Family Estate Planning Law Group. Vinnie has been practicing law since 1985, and his law firm is changing the way people view estate planning through their relationship-oriented practices and ongoing client care program. Vinnie also runs a law firm consulting business called Client Care Academy that trains firms in how they can successfully implement their own client care program. 

Instead of droning on about how the majority of retirees don’t have enough savings and telling you the numbers, let’s talk about how you can supplement your income like a millennial! Millennials, you love them, you hate them, you have one or many in your life, and interestingly enough, they have actually paved the way for retirees to make extra money without having to pick up a traditional part-time job.

According to Experian, over 50% of millennials have a side gig. If you read our last blog, The $1,000,000,000,000 Generation, you’ll recall that millennials are actually a fairly conservative group in that they like to save money, and we have also talked about how many of them want to retire early in a previous blog, New Millennial Retirement Method. It is no surprise that, since this age group is strapped with debt while wanting to save and retire early, they came up with a method to get extra cash: side hustles, aka, side gigs.

The gig economy is growing and by 2021, it is expected to comprise of 9.2 million Americans according to Entrepreneur. What is so appealing about the gig economy is the flexibility, it plays to your talents and knowledge base, and your home base is, well, your home! Retirees should seriously consider tapping into the gig economy because, as you know, most retirees do not have the funds to comfortably cover the entire span of their retirement. Another benefit, money aside, is that having a side hustle allows you to keep structure in your life or continue doing work you love and sharing your talents.

A few entertaining side hustle options you can look into are:

  • Sweatcoin: go for a walk and get paid to exercise
  • TaskRabbit: run errands for people
  • Thumbtack: offer your expertise, clean houses, teach, etc.
  • Swagbucks: be paid for taking polls and surveys and watching videos
  • Vayable: be a tour guide and share all those random facts you’ve collected about your area
  • Air BnB: rent out your house while you visit family, or continually rent your guest bedroom

For retirees who love dogs, check out Wag, you can be paid to walk people’s dogs! You may not want a dog at this stage in life for practical reasons, but it doesn’t mean you can’t have dogs in your daily life, and you’ll be getting some low impact exercise in as well (combine these walks with Sweatcoin to really maximize your earnings).

Check out this article from The Balance that goes into more detail about other side hustle options you might want to consider!

If you are taking social security, note there are certain limitations to income you can receive, but the extra money is a great way to put money in investments, travel, make contributions to a grandchild’s 529, or supplement your current income.

To learn more about Vinnie and his team, visit his website and check out their Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

Reference: MarketWatch, December 1, 2018, Retirees Can Earn Money with These Easy Side Jobs

 

Is An Online Will A Good Idea?

Sure, many of us would prefer to fill in the blanks in private, than have to talk to anyone about our questions. However, it’s better to get professional advice.

MarketWatch’s recent article, “Online wills may save you money, but they can lay these estate-planning traps,” says that if you prepare your taxes yourself and you make a mistake, you may need to meet with the IRS. However, you may never know the results of your work when it comes to an online will. Who will be the ones to find out if you made any mistakes, and need to pay the price? Your family.

You can find many DIY options for completing your own estate plan. With the ease and availability of these programs, along with lower prices, one would think more of us would have an up-to-date estate plan. According to the AARP article, Haven’t Done a Will Yet?, only 4 in 10 American adults have a will or living trust.

The four basic estate planning documents are a will, a trust, power of attorney for financial matters and an advance health care directive. If you try to produce any or all of them through a DIY site, expect to be offered a fill-in-the-blank approach. However, each state has its own probate code and the program you use may have different names for the documents. They also may not address state-specific questions.

Some DIY sites have all these documents, but you must buy their higher-end packages to access them. Others offer what they call a “limited attorney consultation” in the form of a drop-down menu of questions with pre-written responses, not an actual conversation with an attorney.

The range of DIY services also has a range of prices. Some claim it’s $69 for just an online will, and others charge hundreds of dollars for what may be described as a “complete plan.” Some sites have more information than others about their options, so you must dig through the website to be certain you’re getting a legally binding will or other estate planning document. It is important to read the fine print with care.

Most of these websites presume you already know what you want, but most people have no idea what they want or need. When you get into the complexities of family dynamics and trust language specific to your state and situation, these DIY estate planning packages can cause more challenges than working with a qualified estate planning attorney.

Remember: you don’t know what you don’t know. You may not know the case law and legislation that have evolved into your state’s probate code.

Play it safe and schedule a call with us today. Your family will be grateful that you did.

Reference: MarketWatch (May 3, 2019) “Online wills may save you money, but they can lay these estate-planning traps”

 

Estate Planning For Singles

 

A woman is shopping, when suddenly she is struck by abdominal pains that are so severe she passes out in the store. When she comes to, an EMT is asking her questions. One of those questions is “Do you have a living will or a medical power of attorney?” That was a wake-up call for her and should be for other singles also, says Morningstar in the article “2 Estate-Planning Tools That Singles Should Consider.”

People who don’t have children or a married spouse, often think they don’t need any kind of estate plan. However, the truth is, they do. Estate planning when you are single, or have no beneficiaries, can be more important than estate planning as a married individual with children. For singles, power of attorney, medical power of attorney and a living will are especially important.

What is a Living Will? A living will is sometimes called an advance medical directive. It details your wishes, if you are in a situation where life-sustaining treatment is the only way to keep you alive. Would you want to remain on a respirator, have a feeding tube or have other extreme measures used? It’s not pleasant to think about. However, this is an opportunity for you to make this decision on your own behalf, for a possible future date when you won’t be able to convey your wishes. Some people want to stay alive, no matter what. Others would prefer to turn off any artificial means of life support.

This spares your loved ones from having to guess about what you might like to have happen.

What is a Durable Power of Attorney for Healthcare? This is a legal document that gives a person you name the ability to make decisions about healthcare for you, if you can’t. To some people, this matters more than a living will, because the durable power of attorney for healthcare can convey your wishes in situations, where you are not terminally ill, but incapacitated.

Find someone you trust, whose judgment you respect and have a long, serious talk with them. Talk about your preferences for blood transfusions, organ transplants, disclosure about your medical records and more. Doctors have a hard time when a group of relatives and friends are all trying to help, if there is no one person who has been named as your power of attorney for healthcare.  Read more about Healthcare Power of Attorneys here: https://www.elisabethpicklelaw.com/health-care-decisions-in-2019-require-a-medical-power-of-attorney/

What else does a single person need? The documents listed above are just part of an estate plan, not the whole thing. A single person should have a will or a trust, so that they can determine who they want to receive their assets upon death. They should also check on their beneficiary designations from time to time, so any insurance policies, investment accounts, retirement accounts, and any other assets that allow beneficiary designations are going to the correct person. Some accounts also do not permit non-spouses as beneficiaries. As unfair as this is, it does exist.

The takeaway here is that to protect yourself in a health care emergency situation, you should have these documents in place. Speak with an experienced estate planning attorney. This is not a complicated matter, but it is an important one.

Reference: Morningstar (April 23, 2019) “2 Estate-Planning Tools That Singles Should Consider”

What are the Most Common Beneficiary Designations Mistakes?
Common mistakes on beneficiary designation forms.

What are the Most Common Beneficiary Designations Mistakes?

Many people don’t understand that their will doesn’t control who inherits all of their assets when they pass away. Some of a person’s assets pass by beneficiary designation. That’s accomplished by completing a form with the company that holds the asset and naming who will inherit the asset, upon your death.

Kiplinger’s recent article, “Beneficiary Designations: 5 Critical Mistakes to Avoid,” explains that assets including life insurance, annuities and retirement accounts (think 401(k)s, IRAs, 403bs and similar accounts) all pass by beneficiary designation. Many financial companies also let you name beneficiaries on non-retirement accounts, known as TOD (transfer on death) or POD (pay on death) accounts.

Naming a beneficiary can be a good way to make certain your family will get assets directly. However, these beneficiary designations can also cause a host of problems. Make sure that your beneficiary designations are properly completed and given to the financial company, because mistakes can be costly. The article looks at five critical mistakes to avoid when dealing with your beneficiary designations:

  1. Failing to name a beneficiary. Many people never name a beneficiary for retirement accounts or life insurance. If you don’t name a beneficiary for life insurance or retirement accounts, the financial company has it owns rules about where the assets will go after you die. For life insurance, the proceeds will usually be paid to your estate. For retirement benefits, if you’re married, your spouse will most likely get the assets. If you’re single, the retirement account will likely be paid to your estate, which has negative tax ramifications. When an estate is the beneficiary of a retirement account, the assets must be paid out of the retirement account within five years of death. This means an acceleration of the deferred income tax—which must be paid earlier, than would have otherwise been necessary.
  2. Failing to consider special circumstances. Not every person should receive an asset directly. These are people like minors, those with specials needs, or people who can’t manage assets or who have creditor issues. Minor children aren’t legally competent, so they can’t claim the assets. A court-appointed conservator will claim and manage the money, until the minor turns 18. Those with special needs who get assets directly, will lose government benefits because once they receive the inheritance directly, they’ll own too many assets to qualify. People with financial issues or creditor problems can lose the asset through mismanagement or debts. Ask your attorney about creating a trust to be named as the beneficiary.
  3. Designating the wrong beneficiary. Sometimes a person will complete beneficiary designation forms incorrectly. For example, there can be multiple people in a family with similar names, and the beneficiary designation form may not be specific. People also change their names in marriage or divorce. Assets owners can also assume a person’s legal name that can later be incorrect. These mistakes can result in delays in payouts, and in a worst-case scenario of two people with similar names, can mean litigation.
  4. Failing to update your beneficiaries. Since there are life changes, make sure your beneficiary designations are updated on a regular basis.
  5. Failing to review beneficiary designations with your attorney. Beneficiary designations are part of your overall financial and estate plan. Speak with your estate planning attorney to determine the best approach for your specific situation.

Beneficiary designations are designed to make certain that you have the final say over who will get your assets when you die. Take the time to carefully and correctly choose your beneficiaries and periodically review those choices and make the necessary updates to stay in control of your money.

Reference: Kiplinger (April 5, 2019) “Beneficiary Designations: 5 Critical Mistakes to Avoid”

 

What Are the Five “Must Have” Legal Documents?
Five must have estate planning docuuments

What Are the Five “Must Have” Legal Documents?

WTHR 13’s recent article, “The 5 legal documents every adult should have” lists the five key legal documents involved in estate planning.

  1. General Durable Power of Attorney. This document states who you want to make decisions, if you’re unable to do so for yourself. Without it, your family may have to petition the courts to become your legal guardian, which can be time consuming and expensive. A power of attorney allows the person whom you select, to pay your mortgage or rent and your bills.
  2. Health Care Power of Attorney. This document plans for the situation, if you are unable to make your own health care decisions. You name someone you trust, like family members or friends, to do this on your behalf.
  3. Will. This says that when you pass away, here’s what I want to happen. A will states who will get your assets after your death. If you don’t have a valid will in place, the state laws of intestacy will govern what will happen to your estate—which may not be what you want.
  4. Living Will. This is the document in which you state your instructions for end-of-life care, such as life support. This legal document is used to make certain that your family and physicians know what you want your end-of-life care to be. A living will is much different than a will.
  5. Revocable Living Trust. This document can be important, if you’re a parent with young children and would like your assets passed down properly to your children, if you die. Typically, if children are under 18 or 21, they’re legally minors and can’t receive assets. A trust can help coordinate their receiving your property.

An experienced estate planning attorney can help you with the creation of these legal documents, while creating an overall plan so that your wishes are followed, your legacy is protected and your family is secure.

Reference: WTHR 13 (April 17, 2019) “The 5 legal documents every adult should have”

 

Irrevocable Trusts: Can I Revoke It?
Under what circumstances can I revoke an irrevocable trust?

Irrevocable Trusts: Can I Revoke It?

A trust can be revocable or irrevocable, says nj.com’s article, “Can an irrevocable trust be revoked?”

A revocable trust is a living trust that’s created with a written agreement between the person creating the trust (also called the grantor or settlor) and the trustee. That’s the person who will manage the assets in the trust. The person who creates the trust, can also name herself as the trustee for her lifetime, and the trust agreement may say that the grantor can revoke or dissolve the trust. That’s why it’s called a revocable trust.

However, with an irrevocable trust, the grantor doesn’t reserve the right to revoke the trust. In effect, once the assets of an irrevocable trust are re-titled and placed in the trust, they belong to the trust beneficiaries, not the grantor. Nonetheless, an irrevocable trust can still be revoked in some states. The grantor may be able to terminate an irrevocable trust, by following the state laws on dissolution. The laws of each state vary in this area. For example, Arizona has adopted an Arizona Trust Code (“ATC”), which stipulates that an irrevocable trust can be terminated by consent of the trustee and the beneficiaries.

In The Grand Canyon state, an irrevocable trust may be terminated by a court, provided that the termination isn’t inconsistent with a material purpose of the trust.  The court can also terminate the trust if continuance of the trust is not necessary to carry out the Grantor’s purposes. A basis for a petition to the court could be that the trust operation is uneconomic, or there are unanticipated circumstances that impede the ability of the trust to carry out the Grantor’s intent. The court may grant the petition, even if all of the beneficiaries are not represented, as long as it appears that the unrepresented parties’ interests are protected by the proposed changes.

In addition, the ATC provides that a Trustee can, upon notice to all “qualified” beneficiaries, terminate an irrevocable trust with a value of $100,000.00 or less, provided the assets are distributed in a manner consistent with the purposes of the trust. Also, the Trustee or another party can petition the court to distribute the assets of an irrevocable trust in a similar manner where the assets in the trust are not sufficient to allow the trust to continue in operation. A reminder is in order: Married persons who have revocable living trusts are reminded, on the death of the first spouse, that the interest of the deceased spouse becomes “irrevocable” under the vast majority of trusts. In other words, after the first spouse dies, the ATC will require notices to children and grandchildren. It should be noted that under the ATC there are some types of notices and disclosures which may not be overridden by the trust instrument. If the issue of notice to children or grandchildren is a concern, then one should carefully review the trust’s notice provisions with counsel.

Please contact Elisabeth Pickle Law in Scottsdale, Arizona, if you have questions about revocable and irrevocable trusts.

Reference: nj.com (March 25, 2019) “Can an irrevocable trust be revoked?”

 

Shared Housing: What Those ‘Golden Girls’ Got Right

A 75-year-old woman realized that she had reached the point, where she couldn’t live alone anymore. Deborah Knox had Parkinson’s disease, and needed help, if she was going to stay in her three-bedroom house. However, when her new roommate came in with a coffee table and insisted it be featured in the living room, the two had to work things out.

Knox lost the living room battle, but said she’d rather do that, than look at her coffee table in an assisted living setting, as explained in AARP Bulletin’s article “Housemate Wanted. Must Lift Heavy Objects.”

This is not unusual for the newest retirement dynamic — senior housemates. Older Americans are seeking companionship, mutual care and in some cases, a less expensive living situation. The number of households headed by renters 65 and older is expected to balloon by 80%, according to the Joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard University.

A small industry has emerged from this need. There are companies that match housemates, doing background checks and matching up older renters. There are also companies that focus on older homeowners with housemates, who can also help with chores.

The Golden Girls model is alive and well. The trend is more common among women, possibly because women tend to live longer than men and may feel more comfortable living in a communal setting. However, there are challenges. Living with a housemate isn’t without issues. A renter may feel unsettled by the lack of control, while a homeowner may feel agitated at having to share possessions and space.

Sharing houses may not be the American dream, but it may present a solution for seniors who want to maintain their independence.

Shared housing takes work. It also benefits from rules that are written down and agreed upon in advance. One woman purchased an eight-bedroom house in Portland and rented rooms to women who were like her — 55 and older and single. The tenants make their house rules and collectively decide who joins the community. So far, all but three rooms are filled.

Finding a roommate who isn’t family to live with, requires some caution, advise experts. Some services offer a two-week trial and prepare for a confrontation if it does not work for you. Explore all issues, especially the thorny ones, in your first interviews. If your politics or spiritual practices are vastly different, there may be no way to overcome that. You should also discuss the details. Does one person like to watch television all the time, at full blast? If you prefer a quiet house, that’s not going to work out.

Put it in writing, from how costs will be divided to how bills will be paid. Who will be responsible for what chores? Are overnight guests permitted? Does the homeowner have the ultimate say? The more details you can cover, the less room for quarrels.

Remember to focus on the good too: a communal dinner, weekly or daily, and regular outings, can foster friendships in this new phase of life.

Reference: AARP Bulletin (March 14, 2019) “Housemate Wanted. Must Lift Heavy Objects

Will Contests: What’s Happening to Tom Petty’s Estate?

Rocker Tom Petty’s widow, Dana York Petty, planned to include unreleased tracks from her late husband’s celebrated 1994 solo album as part of a 25th anniversary edition box set.

However, Tom’s daughters Adria and Annakim, his children from a previous marriage, are engaged in a will contest, have blocked the release, according to iHeartRadio’s article, “Tom Petty’s Widow, Daughters Battling Over His Estate.”

Dana says the daughters are interfering with her ability to manage Tom’s legacy. She’s reportedly requested that a judge name a day-to-day manager for the estate.

Adria argues that she and her sister were promised an equal share of control in their father’s estate, according to his will. She says her father’s “artistic property” was supposed to be placed into a separate company to be jointly administered by the three women. However, Dana disagrees.

Annakim seems to reference the battle in a recent Instagram post. She displayed a photo of her father with the caption, “We don’t sell out. No Vampires 2019.”

A subsequent reply in the comments section mentions Petty’s will.

Wildflowers was initially designed to be a double album, with Petty completing more than 25 songs in the initial sessions. However, he was convinced by his record label to take some some songs off for the final version.

Throughout the years, a few of the extra songs were released on various collections. However, Tom never relinquished his idea of releasing the set as a double LP.

Petty was reportedly planning a Wildflowers tour, before his death in October of 2017, to showcase all the leftover material.

Reference: iHeartRadio (April 3, 2019) “Tom Petty’s Widow, Daughters Battling Over His Estate”