Beverly Hills 90210 Star Luke Perry Did Have an Estate Plan
Luke Perry

Beverly Hills 90210 Star Luke Perry Did Have an Estate Plan

Luke Perry’s death at age 52 from a condition that we think of as something that happens to older people, has made many people thinks differently about strokes. As reported in the Forbes article “Luke Perry Protected His Family With Estate Planning” Perry was savvy enough to do the proper estate planning, which made a difficult situation easier for his family.

Perry was heavily sedated following the first stroke and five days later, his family made the difficult decision to remove life support. It had become obvious that he was not going to recover, following a second stroke. He was surrounded by his children, 18-year-old Sophie, 21-year-old Jack, Perry’s fiancé, ex-wife, mother, siblings and others.

The decision to allow Luke Perry to die, when only a week earlier he had been alive and vibrant, could not have been easy. It appears that he had the correct legal documents in place, since the hospital allowed his family to make the decision to end life support. In California, those wishes are made in writing, using an Advance Directive or Power of Attorney. Without those documents, his family would have needed to obtain an order from a probate court to permit the hospital to terminate life support, especially if there was any disagreement about this decision from family members.

That would have been a public and painful experience, making things harder for his family.

Perry reportedly had a will created in 2015 leaving everything to his two children. Earlier that year, he had become a spokesperson for screening for colorectal cancer. He had undergone a colonoscopy and learned that he had precancerous growths, which led him to advise others to do the same testing. According to friends, it was after this experience that Perry had a will created to protect his children.

It is thought (but not yet verified) that Perry had a reported net worth of around $10 million, so it’s likely that he created a revocable living trust, in addition to a simple will. If he had only a will, then his estate would have to go through probate court. It’s more likely that he had a trust, and if it was properly funded, then his assets could pass onto his children without any court involvement.

The only question at this time, is whether he made any provisions for his fiancé, Wendy Madison Bauer. Since the will was done in 2015, it’s unlikely that he included her in his estate plan. If they had married, she would have received rights that would not have been automatic but would have depended upon the wording of his will or trust, as well as whether the couple had signed any prenuptial agreements. If they had married and documents did not include an intent to exclude Bauer, she would have been entitled to one-third of his estate.

Luke Perry’s tragic death provides an important lesson for all of us. No one should wait until they are old enough to do estate planning. Perry’s cancer scare, in 2015, gave him the understanding of how quickly life can change, and by having an estate plan in place, he helped his family through a difficult time.

Reference: Forbes (March 8, 2019) “Luke Perry Protected His Family With Estate Planning”

 

Health Care Decisions in 2019 Require a Medical Power of Attorney
Doctor advising a patient

Health Care Decisions in 2019 Require a Medical Power of Attorney

The patient above was asked if she had a living will or a health care directive. She wondered, why are they asking me this? It’s a simple knee replacement surgery. Do they think I am going to die? However, as discussed in the article “Take control of health care decisions in 2019 | Coming of Age…Again” from the Kirkland Reporter, all of these documents need to be in place anytime a medical procedure takes place, no matter how routine the patient may think it is.

Someone, whether a parent, spouse, friend or colleague, needs to be able to have the legal power to make decisions on your behalf, when you cannot. You need a health care directive or a durable Power of Attorney for health care, or both, or to have both of these documents combined into one (depending upon the state you live in; these laws vary by state). In Washington, the official term is health care directive. In other states, the term living will is used.

The health care directive is used to tell doctors and medical caregivers of your choices about medical interventions that you would or would not want to be used, in the unexpected event that you become seriously or critically injured, terminally ill or unable to communicate with those around you.

If you don’t have this document, the decisions will be made by select members of your family with health care professionals. If you don’t want certain things to happen, like being intubated or put on a feeding tube, and they feel strongly that they want to keep you alive, your wishes may not be followed.

A Power of Attorney and health care directives are created when working with an estate planning attorney to create an overall estate plan, which includes your will and any necessary trusts. These documents are too important to try to do on your own. There are major implications. What if they are not executed properly?

The person who is your health care agent has the authority to stop medical treatment on your behalf, or to refuse it. They can hire or fire any medical professional working on your care, and they can determine which medical facility should treat you. They can visit you, regardless of any visitation restrictions, and review your medical records. A durable Power of Attorney for health care gives this person the right to make decisions that are not necessarily covered in your health care directive.

Note that you can revoke your Power of Attorney document at any time, with a written notice to your agent.

These are complicated matters that deserve thoughtful consideration. The person you name will have tremendous responsibility — you are putting your life into their hands. Make sure the person you select is willing to take this responsibility on and have a secondary person in mind, just in case.

Reference: Kirkland Reporter (Feb. 20, 2019) “Take control of health care decisions in 2019 | Coming of Age…Again”

 

Inherited Real Estate That You Don’t Want? Here’s What to Do
Inherited Real Estate

Inherited Real Estate That You Don’t Want? Here’s What to Do

You may have inherited real estate property and not have any experience in owning, managing or selling real estate, so it may feel like an overwhelming burden, says AOL in the article “What to do when you inherit real estate that you don’t want.” However, it’s really not all bad news. You have many options, when you inherit real estate property. You just need to learn what to do with it.

The first thing to know is that you are probably in the middle of a very emotional time, so it’s best not to do anything for the time being. In some states, you don’t have a choice about that, and it’s not a bad thing. For example, in Arizona, there is a 90-day waiting period before you can sell an inherited home.

You will need to start looking for an attorney and a real estate professional to evaluate your options, before doing anything. The estate planning attorney who handled the estate will be able to help, as there will likely be some taxes to be paid and they may be familiar with the property.

Be aware that you are a target for real estate investors. People who inherit real estate may not know the property’s value or understand why it may be worth more in the future. They also know that children often want to get rid of their inherited property quickly, and that a cash payout can be very tempting. They expect to get the property from you at a great discount, fast. Don’t fall victim to this.

Find out how much the property is worth. Do a lot of homework. Look at comparable properties in the area. Don’t rely too heavily on an appraisal, which may have been done as part of the valuation of the estate by the person who gave you the property. Sometimes the appraisal may be dated, or it may reflect other factors that are no longer relevant to the property’s value.

Speak with a number of realtors before choosing one. Remember that they are sales people and have winning personalities and a sympathetic ear. This is a business transaction first. Have them prepare estimates on the value of the property and ask for references. Contact the references and speak with them candidly.

There will be costs associated with the sale of the property. In addition to the real estate commission, you may have to make some investments in the property, if it has not been taken care of over the years.

You might consider selling the property at auction, as-is, which would eliminate any need to dress it up and would speed the process. However, be careful when it comes to the buyer of your property and make sure all costs and fees are in a contract. Have your attorney review the contract to be sure no one is taking advantage of you.

Take your time and be cautious. Your estate planning attorney will have some guidance for you. Selling the family home is an emotional experience, but as a seller, you’ll need to be all business.

Reference: AOL (Feb. 25, 2019) “What to do when you inherit real estate that you don’t want”

 

Digital Assets in Estate Planning: The Brave New World of Estate Planning
Digital Assets in Estate Planning

Digital Assets in Estate Planning: The Brave New World of Estate Planning

Cryptocurrency is almost mainstream, despite its complexity, says Insurance News Net in the article “Westchester County Elder Law Attorney… Sheds Light on Cryptocurrency in Estate Planning.” The IRS has made it clear that as far as federal taxation is concerned, Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies are to be treated as property. However, since cryptocurrency is not tangible property, how is it incorporated into an estate plan?

For starters, recordkeeping is extremely important for any cryptocurrency owner. Records need to be kept that are current and income taxes need to be paid on the transactions every single year. When the owner dies, the beneficiaries will receive the cryptocurrency at its current fair market value. The cost basis is stepped up to the date of death value and it is includable in the decedent’s taxable estate.

Here’s where it gets tricky. The name of the Bitcoin or cryptocurrency owner is not publicly recorded. Instead, ownership is tied to a specific Bitcoin address that can only be accessed by the person who holds two “digital keys.” These are not physical keys, but codes. One “key” is public, and the other key is private. The private key is the secret number that allows the spending of the cryptocurrency.

Both of these digital keys are stored in a “digital wallet,” which, just like the keys, is not an actual wallet but a system used to secure payment information and passwords.

One of the dangers of cryptocurrency is that unlike other financial assets, if that private key is somehow lost, there is no way that anyone can access the digital currency.

It should also be noted that cryptocurrency can be included as an asset in a last will and testament as well as a revocable or irrevocable trust. However, cryptocurrency is highly volatile, and its value may swing wildly.

The executor or trustee of an estate or trust must take steps to ensure that the estate or the trust is in compliance with the Prudent Investor Act. The holdings in the trust or the estate will need to be diversified with other types of investments. If this is not followed, even ownership of a small amount of cryptocurrency may lead to many issues with how the estate or trust was being managed.

Digital currency and digital assets are two relatively new areas for estate planning, although both have been in common usage for many years. As more boomers are dying, planning for these intangible assets has become more commonplace. Failing to have a plan or providing incorrect directions for how to handle digital assets, is becoming problematic for many individuals.

Speak with an estate planning attorney who has experience in digital and non-traditional assets to learn how to protect your heirs and your estate from losses associated with these new types of assets.

Reference: Insurance News Net (Feb. 25, 2019) “Westchester County Elder Law Attorney… Sheds Light on Cryptocurrency in Estate Planning”

 

How Do I Plan for a Blended Family?
How do I plan for a blended family?

How Do I Plan for a Blended Family?

A blended family (or stepfamily) can be thought of as the result of two or more people forming a life together (married or not) that includes children from one or both of their previous relationships, says The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette in a recent article, “You’re in love again, but consider the legal and financial issues before it’s too late.”

Research from the Pew Research Center study reveals a high remarriage rate for those 55 and older—67% between the ages 55 and 64 remarry. Some of the high remarriage percentage may be due to increasing life expectancies or the death of a spouse. In addition, divorces are increasing for older people who may have decided that, with the children grown, they want to go their separate ways.

It’s important to note that although 50% of first marriages end in divorce, that number jumps to 67% of second marriages and 80% of third marriages end in divorce.

So if you’re remarrying, you should think about starting out with a prenuptial agreement. This type of agreement is made between two people prior to marriage. It sets out rights to property and support, in case there’s a divorce or death. Both parties must reveal their finances. This is really helpful, when each may have different income sources, assets and expenses.

You should discuss whose name will be on the deed to your home, which is often the asset with the most value, as well as the beneficiary designations of your life insurance policies, 401(k)s and individual retirement accounts.

It is also important to review the agents under your health care directives and financial powers of attorney. Ask yourself if you truly want your stepchildren in any of these agent roles, which may include “pulling the plug” or ending life support.

Talk to an experienced estate planning attorney about these important documents that you’ll need, when you say “I do” for the second (or third) time.

Reference: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (February 24, 2019) “You’re in love again, but consider the legal and financial issues before it’s too late”

 

Why Should I Create a Trust If I’m Not Rich?
Why should I create a trust if I'm not rich?

Why Should I Create a Trust If I’m Not Rich?

It’s probably not high on your list of fun things to do, considering the way in which your assets will be distributed, when you pass away. However, consider the alternative, which could be family battles, unnecessary taxes and an extended probate process. These issues and others can be avoided by creating a trust.

Barron’s recent article, “Why a Trust Is a Great Estate-Planning Tool — Even if You’re Not Rich,” explains that there are many types of trusts, but the most frequently used for these purposes is a revocable living trust. This trust allows you—the grantor—to specify exactly how your estate will be distributed to your beneficiaries when you die, and at the same time avoiding probate and stress for your loved ones.

When you speak with an estate planning attorney about setting up a trust, also ask about your will, healthcare derivatives, a living will and powers of attorney.

Your attorney will have retitle your probatable assets to the trust. This includes brokerage accounts, real estate, jewelry, artwork, and other valuables. Your attorney can add a pour-over will to include any additional assets in the trust. Retirement accounts and insurance policies aren’t involved with probate, because a beneficiary is named.

While you’re still alive, you have control over the trust and can alter it any way you want. You can even revoke it altogether.

A revocable trust doesn’t require an additional tax return or other processing, except for updating it for a major life event or change in your circumstances. The downside is because the trust is part of your estate, it doesn’t give much in terms of tax benefits or asset protection. If that was your focus, you’d use an irrevocable trust. However, once you set up such a trust it can be difficult to change or cancel. The other benefits of a revocable trust are clarity and control— you get to detail exactly how your assets should be distributed. This can help protect the long-term financial interests of your family and avoid unnecessary conflict.

If you have younger children, a trust can also instruct the trustee on the ages and conditions under which they receive all or part of their inheritance. In second marriages and blended families, a trust removes some of the confusion about which assets should go to a surviving spouse versus the children or grandchildren from a previous marriage.

Trusts can have long-term legal, tax and financial implications, so it’s a good idea to work with an experienced estate planning attorney.

Reference: Barron’s (February 23, 2019) “Why a Trust Is a Great Estate-Planning Tool — Even if You’re Not Rich”

 

Here’s Why You Need an Estate Plan
Five must have estate planning docuuments

Here’s Why You Need an Estate Plan

It’s always the right time to do your estate planning, but it’s most critical when you have beneficiaries who are minors or with special needs, says the Capital Press in the recent article, “Ag Finance: Why you need to do estate planning.”

While it’s likely that most adult children can work things out, even if it’s costly and time-consuming in probate, minor young children must have protections in place. Wills are frequently written, so the estate goes to the child when he reaches age 18. However, few teens can manage big property at that age. A trust can help, by directing that the property will be held for him by a trustee or executor until a set age, like 25 or 30.

Probate is the default process to administer an estate after someone’s death, when a will or other documents are presented in court and an executor is appointed to manage it. It also gives creditors a chance to present claims for money owed to them. Distribution of assets will occur only after all proper notices have been issued, and all outstanding bills have been paid.

Probate can be expensive. However, wise estate planning can help most families avoid this and ensure the transition of wealth and property in a smooth manner. Talk to an experienced estate planning attorney about establishing a trust. Farmers can name themselves as the beneficiaries during their lifetime, and instruct to whom it will pass after their death. A living trust can be amended or revoked at any time, if circumstances change.

The title of the farm is transferred to the trust with the farm’s former owner as trustee. With a trust, it makes it easier to avoid probate because nothing’s in his name, and the property can transition to the beneficiaries without having to go to court. Living trusts also help in the event of incapacity or a disease, like Alzheimer’s, to avoid conservatorship (guardianship of an adult who loses capacity). It can also help to decrease capital gains taxes, since the property transfers before their death.

If you have several children, but only two work with you on the farm, an attorney can help you with how to divide an estate that is land rich and cash poor.

Reference: Capital Press (December 20, 2018) “Ag Finance: Why you need to do estate planning”