So You Want To Retire In Arizona
Retirement in Arizona.

So You Want To Retire In Arizona

Arizona’s population increases in the winter months, which is just one thing it has in common with Florida, says Kiplinger in the article “9 Things You Must Know About Retiring to Arizona.” Many retirees have settled in Arizona year-round. The nation’s first active adult retirement community was in Youngtown, Arizona in 1954. Now 17% of the state’s 7.2 million residents are 65 and older. Let’s look at the Grand Canyon State as a retirement destination.

You’ll have lots of company. Between 2010 and mid-2018, Arizona’s population grew by 12.2%. By comparison, the population of New York (state, not city) only grew 0.8%. In 2018, Arizona ranked number five (behind Vermont, Oregon, Idaho, and Nevada) among states with the most inbound movers. Retirement was the reason for the relocation cited by 37% of the Arizona newcomers in a United Van Lines survey. Arizona has more than 100 age-restricted retirement communities.

It’s a dry heat. You’ve heard it before, and it’s true. The dry heat is more tolerable for most people than the humidity and heat of Florida. Annual precipitation ranges from 3 inches in the arid southwest to 40 inches in the mountains of east central Arizona, according to the Arizona State University’s climate office.

There are plenty of great places to retire. The state isn’t one big arid desert. There are a variety of climates that offer seasonal changes. If health care is important, look at Mesa, one of 10 U.S. cities celebrated by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance in 2018 as great places to retire for your health. Mesa received high scores for its proximity to top-rated hospitals, a cost of living that’s lower than the national average and a variety of activities.

Snowbirds and rental property. Planning to rent before you buy to look at different communities? In most spots, January through March or April is peak snowbird season. Migrators often book the same place for the coming year, before they leave in the spring. Others start booking their rentals as early as August. Early birds get the biggest blocks of time and the most-desirable properties. Expect to pay monthly rent (excluding fees and taxes) of $2,500 to $3,500 for a standard condo (two-bedroom, two-bath) or $3,000 to $9,000 for a single-family home (three-bedroom, two-bath) from January through March.

It’s a seller’s market in late spring. The best time to buy a home in Arizona is usually in the late spring, when the competition from snowbirds ends. In summer and fall, you’ll have fewer options to buy.  However, the remaining sellers may be more motivated and willing to deal. Thinking of buying? Read more about trust planning for your real estate.

Arizona’s income tax for retirees is mixed. Your state tax bill in Arizona will depend a lot on your retirement income sources. Arizona doesn’t tax Social Security benefits, and on most other income that is taxed, rates are low—from 2.59% (for married filers with as much as $20,690 of taxable income) to 4.54% (for married filers with more than $310,317 of taxable income). However, private pensions are fully taxed at ordinary income tax rates. The same is true for government pensions from other states. For those with military, civil service and Arizona state and local government pensions, only the first $2,500 in this income is exempt from Arizona state taxes.

Sales taxes vary. Arizona’s state sales tax is 5.6%. However, localities can add their own sales taxes. As a result, you could pay as much as 5.3% more in sales tax, depending on where you live (and shop).

You don’t need to reset your clocks. Arizona is one of only two states (with Hawaii) that don’t have daylight saving time. Arizona aligns with Pacific Daylight Time in spring, summer, and part of fall. However, they are on Mountain Standard Time during most of the fall and winter.

Reference: Kiplinger (April 19, 2019) “9 Things You Must Know About Retiring to Arizona”

 

Will a Reverse Mortgage Help Me in Retirement?
Will a reverse mortgage help me in retirement?

Will a Reverse Mortgage Help Me in Retirement?

It’s not uncommon for a homeowner to take out a home equity line of credit or borrow against an existing one. This can provide the funds to pay some bills and stay afloat. Another option if you’re at least 62 with a home that’s not heavily mortgaged, is to take out a reverse mortgage. A reverse mortgage gives you tax-free cash. No repayments are due, until you die or move out of the house.

However, these loans are expensive, and not for those people who want to give their home to heirs, because most or all of the home’s equity may be eaten up by the loan principal and interest.

Fed Week’s recent article entitled “Considerations for Borrowing in Retirement” explains that reverse mortgages work best for seniors who need cash, who want to stay in their homes and who have few other options.

These HECM reverse mortgage loans are insured by the Federal Housing Administration (FHA). They let homeowners convert their home equity into cash with no monthly mortgage payments. Borrowers are still required to continue to pay property taxes and insurance. They also must maintain the home, according to FHA guidelines.

People use reverse mortgage loans to pay for home renovations, as well as medical and daily living expenses. Some homeowners who have an existing mortgage will use their reverse mortgage loan to pay off their existing mortgage and get rid of their monthly mortgage payments.

When the homeowner moves, sells the house, or passes away, the loan becomes due. If the house is held until death, heirs have the option to take out a conventional mortgage, pay off the reverse mortgage and continue to live there.

Other options include loans against your life insurance or your securities portfolio.

It is imperative that you talk with a trusted advisor about how a reverse mortgage might fit into your situation. Book a call and become a client today.

Reference: Fed Week (May 16, 2019) “Considerations for Borrowing in Retirement”

 

Guest Blog – Millennial Trend for Retirees: The Side Hustle
Financing retirement

Guest Blog – Millennial Trend for Retirees: The Side Hustle

Today’s blog is a guest blog written by Heidi Cookson, Marketing Director for Vinnie Bonazzoli’s firm, Family Estate Planning Law Group. Vinnie has been practicing law since 1985, and his law firm is changing the way people view estate planning through their relationship-oriented practices and ongoing client care program. Vinnie also runs a law firm consulting business called Client Care Academy that trains firms in how they can successfully implement their own client care program. 

Instead of droning on about how the majority of retirees don’t have enough savings and telling you the numbers, let’s talk about how you can supplement your income like a millennial! Millennials, you love them, you hate them, you have one or many in your life, and interestingly enough, they have actually paved the way for retirees to make extra money without having to pick up a traditional part-time job.

According to Experian, over 50% of millennials have a side gig. If you read our last blog, The $1,000,000,000,000 Generation, you’ll recall that millennials are actually a fairly conservative group in that they like to save money, and we have also talked about how many of them want to retire early in a previous blog, New Millennial Retirement Method. It is no surprise that, since this age group is strapped with debt while wanting to save and retire early, they came up with a method to get extra cash: side hustles, aka, side gigs.

The gig economy is growing and by 2021, it is expected to comprise of 9.2 million Americans according to Entrepreneur. What is so appealing about the gig economy is the flexibility, it plays to your talents and knowledge base, and your home base is, well, your home! Retirees should seriously consider tapping into the gig economy because, as you know, most retirees do not have the funds to comfortably cover the entire span of their retirement. Another benefit, money aside, is that having a side hustle allows you to keep structure in your life or continue doing work you love and sharing your talents.

A few entertaining side hustle options you can look into are:

  • Sweatcoin: go for a walk and get paid to exercise
  • TaskRabbit: run errands for people
  • Thumbtack: offer your expertise, clean houses, teach, etc.
  • Swagbucks: be paid for taking polls and surveys and watching videos
  • Vayable: be a tour guide and share all those random facts you’ve collected about your area
  • Air BnB: rent out your house while you visit family, or continually rent your guest bedroom

For retirees who love dogs, check out Wag, you can be paid to walk people’s dogs! You may not want a dog at this stage in life for practical reasons, but it doesn’t mean you can’t have dogs in your daily life, and you’ll be getting some low impact exercise in as well (combine these walks with Sweatcoin to really maximize your earnings).

Check out this article from The Balance that goes into more detail about other side hustle options you might want to consider!

If you are taking social security, note there are certain limitations to income you can receive, but the extra money is a great way to put money in investments, travel, make contributions to a grandchild’s 529, or supplement your current income.

To learn more about Vinnie and his team, visit his website and check out their Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

Reference: MarketWatch, December 1, 2018, Retirees Can Earn Money with These Easy Side Jobs

 

Are You Retiring in 2019? Here’s What You Need to Know
Preparing for retirement

Are You Retiring in 2019? Here’s What You Need to Know

There are more than few steps you’ll need to complete, before packing up your desk, cubicle or locker and saying good bye to your work family. Even if your 401(k) and IRA is in order, there are things you need to during the last few months of working, says Next Avenue in the article “Tips to Prepare for Retiring This Spring or Summer.”

There’s detailed planning, organization of documents, and additional financial details that need attending. You may also want to start creating your “bucket list” — a list of things you’ve always wanted to do, but never had the time to do while you were working. Getting all of this in order, will speed your waiting time and prepare you better, when the last day of your working life does finally arrive.

Whether you are three months or six months from retirement, here are some tips for your to-do list:

Social Security. Figure out when the best time for you to take Social Security benefits will be. Can you delay it until age 70? That’s when you’ll get the biggest payout. The earlier you start collecting benefits, the smaller your monthly check will be. Take it early, and you are locked in to this lower rate.

Health Care. Figuring out how to manage health care costs, is the single biggest worry of retirement for most Americans. An injury that puts you in a nursing care facility can make a huge dent in your retirement funds, even if it’s just for a short while. This is the time of your life, when focusing on your health is most important, even if you’ve been careless in earlier decades. Evaluate your health status and get check ups with your regular physician and your dentist.

Investments. Check with your HR department about when you’ll need to roll over your 401(k) plan. If you transfer the funds into a low-cost IRA, you may save in fees. Work with your financial advisor to determine what your withdrawal rate will be. You may need to reevaluate some of your retirement goals or consider working part time during retirement for a few years.

Medicare. If you’re almost 65, you can start enrolling in Medicare now. The government lets you start the process within three months of your 65th birthday. Start this process, so you are covered, once you are not on the company’s health care plan.

Expectations. The first six months to a year of retirement can be both wonderful and terrible. While enjoying freedom, many people find it hard to withdraw money from the same accounts they spent so many years building. What if they don’t have enough for a long life? Take a realistic look at your lifestyle, budget, and spending habits, before you retire to make sure you are financially ready to do so. If you think you might work part time, look into the positions that are available in your area and what they pay.

Lifestyle. Often, we are so busy planning for the financial side of retirement, that we forget to plan for the “soft” side: what will you do in retirement? Will you volunteer with an organization that has meaning for you? Write the novel you’ve started on a dozen times? Spend more time with your grandchildren? Travel? What will make you feel like your time is being well-spent, and what will make you fulfilled?

Don’t forget the legal plan. Retired or not, you need to have a will, power of attorney, and health care power of attorney to protect your family, whether you are preparing for retirement or in the middle of your career. Speak with an estate planning attorney to ensure that these important documents are in place.

Reference: Next Avenue (March 6, 2019) “Tips to Prepare for Retiring This Spring or Summer”