Will a Reverse Mortgage Help Me in Retirement?
Will a reverse mortgage help me in retirement?

Will a Reverse Mortgage Help Me in Retirement?

It’s not uncommon for a homeowner to take out a home equity line of credit or borrow against an existing one. This can provide the funds to pay some bills and stay afloat. Another option if you’re at least 62 with a home that’s not heavily mortgaged, is to take out a reverse mortgage. A reverse mortgage gives you tax-free cash. No repayments are due, until you die or move out of the house.

However, these loans are expensive, and not for those people who want to give their home to heirs, because most or all of the home’s equity may be eaten up by the loan principal and interest.

Fed Week’s recent article entitled “Considerations for Borrowing in Retirement” explains that reverse mortgages work best for seniors who need cash, who want to stay in their homes and who have few other options.

These HECM reverse mortgage loans are insured by the Federal Housing Administration (FHA). They let homeowners convert their home equity into cash with no monthly mortgage payments. Borrowers are still required to continue to pay property taxes and insurance. They also must maintain the home, according to FHA guidelines.

People use reverse mortgage loans to pay for home renovations, as well as medical and daily living expenses. Some homeowners who have an existing mortgage will use their reverse mortgage loan to pay off their existing mortgage and get rid of their monthly mortgage payments.

When the homeowner moves, sells the house, or passes away, the loan becomes due. If the house is held until death, heirs have the option to take out a conventional mortgage, pay off the reverse mortgage and continue to live there.

Other options include loans against your life insurance or your securities portfolio.

It is imperative that you talk with a trusted advisor about how a reverse mortgage might fit into your situation. Book a call and become a client today.

Reference: Fed Week (May 16, 2019) “Considerations for Borrowing in Retirement”

 

Planning for a Special Needs Child

Estate planning is important for everyone, but it’s even more crucial for a family with a child who has special needs. It’s difficult to create an estate plan for children with special needs, because you don’t know what type of care he will need, or the type of government benefits for which she’ll be eligible, when she turns 18. People frequently become overwhelmed about special needs planning, because they don’t have a clear picture of what their children will need in the future.

A recent Forbes article, “Special Needs Kids Require Specialized Estate Planning,” says that if you have a child with special needs, it’s critical that you look at your planning options with your estate planning attorney and discuss your child’s health, capabilities and prognosis. You can then customize a plan that works for your child, with as much flexibility as possible.

Those with enough assets often would rather not to have their child get any government benefits and will set aside an amount to cover all the child’s living expenses in trust. Since the parents aren’t concerned with government benefits, the trust can be a discretionary trust that will distribute income and principal at the trustee’s discretion for the benefit of the child throughout the child’s life.

If there is a good chance the child will get government benefits, many parents create special needs trust to supplement (not replace) the government benefits that the child will receive. The trust must be drafted, so the child doesn’t become ineligible for the government benefits. These benefits provide for the child’s basic needs like a place to live, so the special needs trust will defray the cost of extras such as trips and entertainment.

If the parents can’t determine if their child will be eligible for government benefits, another option is for the parents to give their current trustees the authority to create a separate special needs trust at the time of the surviving parent’s death. Therefore, if the child is receiving benefits, the trustee can create the trust at that time, with the goal of preserving the child’s benefits.

All these trusts can be funded now. The parents can establish the trust and transfer cash or other assets to it, or the trust can be created now and left empty until a parent passes away. At that point, money can move into the trust from the parent’s estate, another trust or from a life insurance policy.

Some parents elect not to create a trust for their child and to disinherit him completely. The thinking is that the child can be supported solely by government benefits. Others go with a combination approach. They disinherit the special needs child and leave more assets to their other children, with the understanding that the other children will care for the special needs child. However, this isn’t a great idea. The siblings have no legal obligation to care for his or her sibling with special needs, just a moral one. If the child who inherited the bulk of the estate gets divorced, the assets are also susceptible to division upon divorce. Finally, the assets are liable to a creditor’s claim, if the child is sued.

Estate planning for a child with special needs can be hard, so get a flexible plan in place that will provide peace of mind.

Reference: Forbes (March 27, 2019) “Special Needs Kids Require Specialized Estate Planning” 

Digital Assets in Estate Planning: The Brave New World of Estate Planning
Digital Assets in Estate Planning

Digital Assets in Estate Planning: The Brave New World of Estate Planning

Cryptocurrency is almost mainstream, despite its complexity, says Insurance News Net in the article “Westchester County Elder Law Attorney… Sheds Light on Cryptocurrency in Estate Planning.” The IRS has made it clear that as far as federal taxation is concerned, Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies are to be treated as property. However, since cryptocurrency is not tangible property, how is it incorporated into an estate plan?

For starters, recordkeeping is extremely important for any cryptocurrency owner. Records need to be kept that are current and income taxes need to be paid on the transactions every single year. When the owner dies, the beneficiaries will receive the cryptocurrency at its current fair market value. The cost basis is stepped up to the date of death value and it is includable in the decedent’s taxable estate.

Here’s where it gets tricky. The name of the Bitcoin or cryptocurrency owner is not publicly recorded. Instead, ownership is tied to a specific Bitcoin address that can only be accessed by the person who holds two “digital keys.” These are not physical keys, but codes. One “key” is public, and the other key is private. The private key is the secret number that allows the spending of the cryptocurrency.

Both of these digital keys are stored in a “digital wallet,” which, just like the keys, is not an actual wallet but a system used to secure payment information and passwords.

One of the dangers of cryptocurrency is that unlike other financial assets, if that private key is somehow lost, there is no way that anyone can access the digital currency.

It should also be noted that cryptocurrency can be included as an asset in a last will and testament as well as a revocable or irrevocable trust. However, cryptocurrency is highly volatile, and its value may swing wildly.

The executor or trustee of an estate or trust must take steps to ensure that the estate or the trust is in compliance with the Prudent Investor Act. The holdings in the trust or the estate will need to be diversified with other types of investments. If this is not followed, even ownership of a small amount of cryptocurrency may lead to many issues with how the estate or trust was being managed.

Digital currency and digital assets are two relatively new areas for estate planning, although both have been in common usage for many years. As more boomers are dying, planning for these intangible assets has become more commonplace. Failing to have a plan or providing incorrect directions for how to handle digital assets, is becoming problematic for many individuals.

Speak with an estate planning attorney who has experience in digital and non-traditional assets to learn how to protect your heirs and your estate from losses associated with these new types of assets.

Reference: Insurance News Net (Feb. 25, 2019) “Westchester County Elder Law Attorney… Sheds Light on Cryptocurrency in Estate Planning”